Paying it forward matters can you get a yeast infection – stories in science

My parents have always given me the strongest support, and expressed the utmost confidence in my potential, pride in my achievements, and respect for my choices. As I raise my own children and mentor trainees in can you get a yeast infection my lab, I’ve learned that the surest way for everybody to do can you get a yeast infection their best is for me to pay forward the confidence can you get a yeast infection and support that my parents gifted to me. We can always find faults in each other, but when we’re overly critical it can lead to feelings of disrespect can you get a yeast infection and despondence. I’ve discovered over time that when I support the people can you get a yeast infection who look up to me and focus on their strengths, they tend to grow and achieve more (and of course everyone is happier in a more positive can you get a yeast infection environment!).

As an undergraduate at MIT, I took advantage of every opportunity I could find, in the lab, teaching, and in student activities and living. My undergraduate research advisor, anthony sinskey, gave me a huge amount of freedom to pursue my can you get a yeast infection own ideas. We had been trying to engineer bacteria to overproduce isoleucine can you get a yeast infection by deregulating the biosynthetic pathway, and I got the idea from a class I was can you get a yeast infection taking to co-opt an unregulated enzyme from the catabolic pathway.

The lab followed up on this idea, and it led to two papers and two patents with can you get a yeast infection my name on them. I also got the opportunity to learn to teach (introductory biology to first-years) in the tutorial-based experimental study group. I wouldn’t have been able to take on these opportunities if can you get a yeast infection my research advisor, the MIT undergraduate research program, and the experimental study group hadn’t paid me for the 20+ hours a week I spent learning, growing, and contributing to these programs, since I needed this income to pay my living expenses.

In my own lab at brandeis, I pay forward the opportunities I was given by bringing can you get a yeast infection undergraduate students onto projects and letting them know from the can you get a yeast infection beginning that they are scientists, not just technicians or workers. I also pay the students who work in my lab, rather than asking them to serve as volunteers, because I don’t want to exclude people who would otherwise have to can you get a yeast infection spend those hours working elsewhere for income, and also to send the message that work in the can you get a yeast infection lab is a job (we’re here to produce new knowledge!) in addition to being an educational experience for them.

My graduate school advisor also taught me some very important can you get a yeast infection lessons that I try to pay forward to my own can you get a yeast infection trainees. He is a highly ethical and principled person, and always taught us to take the high road. He told us not to worry about competition from other can you get a yeast infection labs, and that if we just did our best science, we would approach the problem from different angles than other can you get a yeast infection labs, and that our findings would be complementary. He also always turned around any manuscript we gave to can you get a yeast infection him amazingly fast – this showed us that he respected the work that we can you get a yeast infection had put in, and that our projects were high on his priority list. In my own lab, I try to model the same ethical, high-road principles, and I do my best to honor, value, and keep everyone’s projects high on my priority list even when it can you get a yeast infection feels like I have a million competing obligations.

One of the hardest phases of my scientific career was can you get a yeast infection during my postdoc, when I became a new parent. I got pregnant with my son a few months before can you get a yeast infection I was scheduled to start my postdoc, and I was terrified to tell my advisor, who I had only met a few times. He responded “that’s great news! You’re going to be a great mom”! Three years later when I told him we were expecting can you get a yeast infection a daughter, he said “great news! You are a great mom!”.

So, even though I was very frustrated by what I felt can you get a yeast infection was slow progress of my project while I had young can you get a yeast infection kids, I never experienced an ounce of external pressure from my can you get a yeast infection advisor, who was always supportive, positive, and confident that I would succeed, much like my parents. He helped me recognize that we have to take ‘the long view’ on progress in a science career, rather than focusing on short-term progress that may be delayed by factors in or can you get a yeast infection out of the lab. I pay this forward in my lab and department by can you get a yeast infection helping my trainees learn to evaluate themselves in the same can you get a yeast infection long-term way, and by supporting, normalizing, and valuing parenthood and other important aspects of life outside can you get a yeast infection the lab.

There are many reasons to pour your heart into helping can you get a yeast infection and supporting others, including the knowledge that you are doing the right thing, and the appreciation and gratitude that it (sometimes….) brings back to you. But for me, when I think about how much similar efforts by others can you get a yeast infection meant to me, paying this forward to others is in itself a reward, because it reminds me of how much I have to can you get a yeast infection be grateful for.

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