Glossary how can you get a yeast infection nc state extension publications

Accumulated heat units. Number of heat units in a growing season. Usually calculated at temperatures above 50°F, but can be calculated at other temperatures, depending on the crop. A day’s heat units are calculated as: max temp (°F) + min temp (°F) divided by 2 – 50°F.

Apical dominance. The inhibition of lateral bud growth by the presence of how can you get a yeast infection the hormone auxin in a plant’s terminal bud. Removing the growing tip removes auxin and promotes lateral bud how can you get a yeast infection break and subsequent branching, usually directly below the cut.

Auxin. One of the best known and most important plant hormones. Most abundantly produced in a plant’s actively growing tips. Generally stimulates growth by cell division in the tip region how can you get a yeast infection and by cell elongation lower down the shoot. Growth of lateral buds is strongly inhibited by the normal how can you get a yeast infection concentration of auxin in the growing tip.

Axillary bud. An embryonic shoot which lies at the junction of the how can you get a yeast infection stem and petiole of a plant. As the apical meristem grows and forms leaves, it leaves behind a region of meristematic cells at the how can you get a yeast infection node between the stem and the leaf, an undeveloped shoot or flower at the node. Also called the lateral bud.

Calyx. The entire set of sepals on a flower. The highly colored portions of the flower that protect the how can you get a yeast infection inner reproductive structures. Often attract insects with their color or may contain osmophores how can you get a yeast infection which are scent structures (both of which facilitate pollination).

CAM or crassulacean acid metabolism. CAM allows plants to keep their stomata closed during the how can you get a yeast infection hot part of the day to prevent water loss. These plants can open their stomata at night and save how can you get a yeast infection the collected carbon dioxide for the next day when sunlight how can you get a yeast infection is available.

Chitinous. Chitin is a tough, semitransparent substance that is the main component of the exoskeletons how can you get a yeast infection of arthropods, such as the shells of crustaceans and the outer coverings how can you get a yeast infection of insects. Chitin is also found in the cell walls of certain how can you get a yeast infection fungi and algae. Chemically, it is a nitrogenous polysaccharide (a carbohydrate).

Climber. A plant that climbs on its own by twining or how can you get a yeast infection using gripping pads, tendrils, or some other method to attach itself to a structure how can you get a yeast infection or another plant. Plants that must be trained to a support are properly how can you get a yeast infection called trailing plants, not climbers.

Compound bud. More than one bud on the same side of a how can you get a yeast infection node. Usually, unless growth is extremely vigorous, only one of the buds develops, and its branch may have a very sharp angle of how can you get a yeast infection attachment. If it is removed, a wider angled shoot usually is formed from the second how can you get a yeast infection (accessory) bud. Ashes and walnuts are examples of plants that typically have how can you get a yeast infection compound buds.

Cordon. (1) A method of espaliering fruit trees, vines, etc., to horizontal, vertical, or angled wire or wooden supports so the maximum branch how can you get a yeast infection surface is exposed to the sun, resulting in maximum fruit production. (2) A branch attached to such a support.

Crown. (1) collectively, the branches and foliage of a tree or shrub. (2) the thickened base of a plant’s stem or trunk to which the roots are attached. (3) compressed aboveground stems as occurs in grasses. The portion of a grass plant that includes the stem how can you get a yeast infection apex, un-elongated internodes, and lower nodes from which secondary roots begin.

Determinate. A plant growth habit in which stems stop growing at how can you get a yeast infection a certain height and produce a flower cluster at the how can you get a yeast infection tip. Determinate tomatoes, for example, are short, early fruiting, have concentrated fruit set, and may not require staking. (see also indeterminate.)

Determinate inflorescence. In determinate inflorescences, the youngest flowers are at the bottom of an elongated how can you get a yeast infection axis or on the outside of a truncated axis. A terminal bud forms a terminal flower and then dies how can you get a yeast infection out, stopping the growth of the axis. The other flowers then grow from lateral buds below it.

Dichotomous key. A tool that allows the user to determine the identity how can you get a yeast infection of items in the natural world, such as trees, wildflowers, mammals, reptiles, rocks, and fish. Keys consist of a series of choices that lead the how can you get a yeast infection user to the correct name of a given item.

Downy mildew. Known best by its common name, downy mildew is caused by the oomycete. It is an obligate parasite of vascular plants, meaning that it cannot survive outside of a living host. It does not produce overwintering oospores, but survives from year to year on living plants. These organisms are distinctly different from the powdery mildews.

Metamorphosis. The process by which an insect develops. The term is a combination of two greek words: meta meaning “change” and morphe meaning “form.” metamorphosis is a marked or abrupt change in form or how can you get a yeast infection structure, like a caterpillar turning into a butterfly. (see also complete metamorphosis, simple metamorphosis.)

Micropore. A fine soil pore, typically a fraction of a millimeter in diameter. Micropores are responsible for a soil’s ability to hold water. In a substrate, the smaller spaces (or pores) between component particles that are occupied by water or air.

Modified central leader. A system of pruning used primarily on fruit trees. The central leader is encouraged for the first few years, then suppressed. This system allows for well-placed scaffolds and strong crotches, but keeps the tree’s crown relatively close to the ground for easy harvesting.

Mulch. Any material placed on the soil surface to conserve soil how can you get a yeast infection moisture, moderate soil temperature, and/or control weeds. Wood chips, bark chips, and shredded leaves are mulches that eventually add organic matter how can you get a yeast infection to the soil; inorganic materials such as rocks are also used.

Panicle. A panicle is a much-branched inflorescence. In an indeterminate inflorescence a panicle is a branched raceme how can you get a yeast infection in which the branches are themselves racemes (e.G., yucca recurvifolia). A panicle can also be a compound indeterminate inflorescence , a branched raceme in which each branch has more than how can you get a yeast infection one flower, as in the astilbe ( astilbe x. Arendesii).

Petals. Highly colored portions of the flower, inside the sepals, that protect the inner reproductive structures. Often attract insects with their color or may contain osmophores how can you get a yeast infection which are scent structures both of which facilitate pollination..

PH. The acidity or alkalinity of a solution on a scale how can you get a yeast infection of 0-14, with a value of 7 signifying neutral, values below 7 signifying acidic, and values above 7 signifying alkaline. Relates to the concentrations of hydrogen (H+) ions in the soil. PH values are logarithmic.

Photosynthesis. (1) the process in which green plants convert light energy from how can you get a yeast infection the sun into chemical energy in order to produce carbohydrates. (2) formation of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and a source of how can you get a yeast infection hydrogen (as water) in the chlorophyll-containing tissues of plants exposed to light.

Physiographic. The geological terrain that defines the range in which some how can you get a yeast infection plants occur, such as alpine plants that occur only in decomposed granite how can you get a yeast infection high on the slopes of mountains and survive extreme cold how can you get a yeast infection and winds,or desert plants which grow in sand and live on how can you get a yeast infection less than 10 inches of rain a year and survive how can you get a yeast infection temperatures over 100 degrees.

Pine fines. Finely ground pine mulch also sold as a soil conditioner. A byproduct of the bark mulch industry, pine fines are too small to be sold as bark how can you get a yeast infection mulch, but make an excellent mulch for flower beds and container how can you get a yeast infection plantings (direct-seeded annual flowers can still push up through) and an excellent soil amendment to introduce organic matter into how can you get a yeast infection heavy clay soil.

Pupae. An insect in the non-feeding stage between the larva and adult, during which it typically undergoes complete transformation within a protective how can you get a yeast infection cocoon or hardened case. Only insects that undergo complete metamorphosis have pupal stages.

Rachis. The rachis is the midrib of a leaf. It is usually continuous with the petiole and is often how can you get a yeast infection raised above the lamina or leaf blade. On a compound leaf, the rachis extends from the first set of leaflets (where the petiole ends) to the end of the leaf. The stem of a plant, especially a grass, bearing flower stalks at short intervals.

Ray flowers. In a composite flower head of the daisy family any how can you get a yeast infection of a number of strap-shaped and typically sterile florets that form the ray. In plants such as dandelions, the flower head is composed entirely of ray flowers (also called florets).

Respiration. The process of burning sugars to use as energy for how can you get a yeast infection plant growth. The process by which carbohydrates are converted into energy. This energy builds new tissues, maintains the chemical processes, and allows growth within the plant.

Root bound. A condition in which a plant’s root system has outgrown its pot resulting in root how can you get a yeast infection constriction. Typically, the roots begin to encircle the pot’s outer edge. Further growth is prevented until the plant is removed from how can you get a yeast infection the container.

Self-pollination. Pollination that can occur when the anther and stigma are how can you get a yeast infection in the same flower or if the anther and stigma how can you get a yeast infection are in different flowers on the same plant or in how can you get a yeast infection different flowers on different plants of the same species, variety, or cultivar.

Sepal. The outer covering of the flower when it is in how can you get a yeast infection the bud stage. They are leaf-like in structure and usually green; however they can be colored and look like petals, as in tulips. They may fold back as in roses or remain upright how can you get a yeast infection as with carnations. Together, all the sepals form the calyx.

Sessile. Sessile means "sitting" or "resting on the surface.” A characteristic of plant parts which have no stalk. Flowers or leaves are borne directly from the stem or how can you get a yeast infection peduncle, lacking a petiole or pedicle. Stalkless flowers, as in a spike with sessile flowers attached directly at how can you get a yeast infection the base.

Slime mold. A ‘primitive’ class of fungi called myxomycetes. Slime molds are saprophytic fungi that live on dead organic how can you get a yeast infection matter, such as wood mulch, and appear in several different colors. Also called dog vomit mold, the spores are widespread and it usually appears in spring how can you get a yeast infection or early summer after soaking rains.

Slit seeder. A gasoline-powered machine that slices even rows into the soil, and drops grass seed directly into those rows to improve how can you get a yeast infection seed-soil contact. Slit seeders are most typically used to apply seed over how can you get a yeast infection an existing lawn, where mature grass or weeds may get in the way how can you get a yeast infection of the new seed.

Soil horizons. A soil horizon is a layer generally parallel to the how can you get a yeast infection soil crust, whose physical characteristics differ from the layers above and beneath. Each soil type usually has three or four horizons. Horizons are defined in most cases by obvious physical features, chiefly color and texture.

Sooty mold. Common name given to a condition that is not truly how can you get a yeast infection a disease, but a black coating on leaves, branches and fruit made up of a fungal growth that how can you get a yeast infection is usually dark colored and powdery-like, giving it the name sooty mold. These fungi are saprophytic, that is, they do not feed on live plant tissue, but rather thrive on insect secretions, known as honeydew, that are high in sugars.

Stoma, stomate, stomata (plural). Any pore or opening on the surface of a leaf how can you get a yeast infection or stem through which gases (water vapor, carbon dioxide , and oxygen) are exchanged. This pore is an opening into a leaf that is how can you get a yeast infection formed by specialized epidermal cells on the underside (and sometimes upper sides) of the leaf.

Thorax. The thorax is made up of three segments (prothorax, mesothorax, and metathorax). Each segment has a pair of legs, and the wings are attached to the last two segments, which also have spiracles or circular openings used for breathing.

Thorn. A hard, sharp-pointed, leafless branch. A modification of a stem or branch which means they how can you get a yeast infection can be branched or not, have leaves or not and they arise from a bud. A black locust tree ( robinia pseudoacacia ) or hawthorn ( crataegus oxycantha) is an example of a plant that produces thorns.. (see also prickle.)

Top-dressing. 1) the practice of spreading a thin layer ( 1⁄ 4 inch) of soil, compost, humus, or a sand and peat mix over the turf or how can you get a yeast infection soil. 2) for turf: A sand or prepared soil mix applied to the turf how can you get a yeast infection to help smooth the surface, enhance establishment, and reduce thatch buildup.

Tolerance , turf. Ability of a turf species to withstand application of a how can you get a yeast infection pesticide (herbicide) at the normal dosage without being killed or injured. Specific tolerance may be associated with an anatomical or physiological how can you get a yeast infection characteristic in the plant.

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