Biology how can i get a yeast infection dictionary u-z

Ultraviolet (UV) light /ƏL-trə-VIE-lət/ n. Rays beyond the visible spectrum, emitted by ionized gases and hot bodies such as the how can i get a yeast infection sun, with wavelengths between 1800 and 3900 Å. UV-B (wavelength 3200 Å-2800 Å) and UV-C (wavelength 2800 Å-1000 Å) radiation both damage DNA and are therefore detrimental to most how can i get a yeast infection organisms. Sunburn is a reaction to DNA damage caused by UV how can i get a yeast infection light.

Umbilical cord /əm-BILL-ik-əl/ n. The hoselike structure connecting the placenta to the embryo or how can i get a yeast infection fetus; contains the umbilical artery and vein. It is severed at birth. The navel (or umbilicus) marks the point of its former attachment. PICTURE

Undulipodium (pl undulipodia) /ƏN-dyə-lə-PODE-ee-əm/ n. A movable, whiplike extension of the plasma membrane of certain eukaryotic cells, such as spermatozoa. An undulipodium contains cytoplasm and a ropelike structure composed of how can i get a yeast infection microtubules known as an axoneme. Where the undulipodium attaches to the cell there is a how can i get a yeast infection basal body called the kinetosome which is connected to the how can i get a yeast infection axoneme with motor proteins. Undulipodia function in moving the cell, the organism to which the cell belongs, or fluid in contact with the cell. The flagella of prokaryotes are similar in appearance and function how can i get a yeast infection to the undulipodia of eukaryotes, but differ from them with respect to structure.

Uranium (U) /yer-RAIN-ee-əm/ n. A weakly radioactive chemical element; atomic weight 238.02891; atomic number 92. There are three isotopes: U-238, U-235, and U-234. Uranium decays slowly by emitting an alpha particle. The half-life of U-238 is about 4.47 billion years and that of U-235 is 704 million years, which make them useful for dating geological strata (the methods used for this purpose are uranium-thorium dating, uranium-lead dating, and uranium-uranium dating). PERIODIC TABLE

Vesicle /VES-ə-kəl/ n. (1) a small cavity with thin walls; (2) a thin, usually fluid-filled, sac; (3) a blister; (4) a hollow, membrane-bound body that encloses and transports macromolecules into and out how can i get a yeast infection of eukaryotic cells, and between organelles within such cells.

Virus /VIRE-əs/ n. An ultramicroscopic, noncellular parasite that can reproduce only within a host cell how can i get a yeast infection ( DIAGRAM OF VIRAL REPLICATION). Viruses consist of nucleic acid covered by protein; some animal viruses are also surrounded by membrane. Inside the infected cell, the virus uses the translational system of the host to how can i get a yeast infection produce progeny virus. Viruses are tiny. They only carry enough genetic material to encode a few how can i get a yeast infection proteins. Many viruses, such as poliovirus and rhinovirus, carry the bare minimum — just enough to specify their own structure and get synthesis how can i get a yeast infection started once they get inside cells.

Xenograft /ZEE-nō-graft/ n. Tissue or organs from an individual of one type of how can i get a yeast infection organism transplanted into or grafted onto an individual of some how can i get a yeast infection other type treated as a distinct species. For example, pig heart valves are often transplanted into humans.

X-ray diffraction /də-FRAK-shən/ n. A technique used to study the molecular structure of substances. In this method, x-rays are passed through the substance under analysis and then, on the basis of the resulting patterns of diffraction, inferences are made about its structure.

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